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Disputes are no game

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Posted by Nathan Talbott on 13 August 2017

Nathan Talbott - Financial Disputes Lawyer
Nathan Talbott Partner

We were instructed by a gaming software developer who was in dispute with a development company in relation to deliverables on representative hardware. Our client’s position was that the deliverables worked on the representative hardware, whereas the development company said that when the software was used on the hardware at their office, there were coding errors.

Our client and the development company had been in dispute for a number of months and were becoming entrenched in their respective positions. On our instruction we negotiated terms whereby the parties could move forward in a commercially sensible fashion and drafted the settlement agreement.

The settlement agreement eliminated any risk our client faced in terms of claims by the development company that had been intimated in correspondence between the parties. The money owed to our client was paid in a timely fashion and the relationship ended on good terms. Prior to compromising the dispute, our client was facing huge commercial pressures which the conclusion of the settlement agreement alleviated.

About the author

Nathan is a member of our tax and financial services litigation team dealing with disputes relating to investments, tax schemes, pensions and HMRC enquiries and negotiations.

Nathan Talbott

Nathan is a member of our tax and financial services litigation team dealing with disputes relating to investments, tax schemes, pensions and HMRC enquiries and negotiations.

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